Residents and businesses help cut water use by 14 percent

WASHINGTON, D.C. – September 11, 2015 – (RealEstateRama) — Bellevue residents and businesses have done their part in helping the region cut water use by 14 percent over the last four weeks — exceeding requests by water providers to cut use by 10 percent.

While the recent rains have helped, it has not been enough to return water supplies to normal levels. Bellevue Utilities reminds residents and businesses that more rain and continued water reductions are still needed to replenish regional water supplies for people and fish.

The city urges residents and businesses to continue to reduce their water consumption indoors now that the weather has cooled, and continue to reduce outdoor use as well. Here are some water saving tips:

Indoor water-saving tips for residents:

  • Reduce showering time;
  • Check for and fix leaks;
  • Wash only full loads of laundry and dishes;
  • Turn off the tap while brushing teeth or shaving;
  • Don’t pre-rinse dishes; and
  • If purchasing fixtures/equipment, choose water-efficient models.

Indoor water-saving tips for businesses:

  • Encourage reduced showering times at your facilities;
  • Serve water only on request;
  • Check for and fix leaks;
  • Wash only full loads of laundry and dishes;
  • Provide new towels only on request;
  • Check cooling towers for overflow and excessive blowdown; and
  • If purchasing fixtures/equipment, choose water-efficient models.

Outdoor water-saving tips for residents:

  • Let lawns go dormant and limit plant watering to twice a week;
  • Water plants before 8 a.m. or after 7 p.m.;
  • Wash your vehicle(s) at locations that recycle the water;
  • Do only essential pressure washing;
  • Minimize refilling swimming pools and hot tubs; and
  • Turn off water features

Bellevue’s water shortage response went into effect July 27 when it joined its water provider, Cascade Water Alliance, as part of a larger regional response by Seattle Public Utilities, Tacoma Water and the City of Everett. The response plan has four stages: advisory, voluntary, mandatory and emergency curtailment. Currently, Bellevue, which gets its water from Seattle Public Utilities, is in the voluntary stage, which was declared Aug. 11.

SHARE
Previous articleMayor proposes expansion of affordable housing tax exemption program
Next articleSeattle Continues to Focus on Energy Efficiency of Buildings